The Power Of Keyword Search Data Reports In AdWords

If you’re a digital marketer, you have probably managed Google AdWords Campaigns a few times or use it on a regular basis. The primary reason we love using Adwords is because of the precision to get down and target searcher intent, to get in front of the right people, not just the most people. If you’ve used AdWords, you know it offers a variety of metrics and reports allowing you to track and analyze your ads and keyword performance in order to optimize your efforts. All you need to do is use the reports wisely to make the most of your campaigns.

Track Keywords to Determine Your Success

One of the most important things you need to monitor in AdWords are keywords. By analyzing your keyword performance, you will be able to review which ones are helping you meet your advertising goals for the ads that show up in Google Search Network, and which ones do not.

In order to track and review your keywords performance, you can either:

–    open the Campaigns section from the top menu, then choose the Keywords tab; or
–    open the Reports section from the top menu, and then from the Pre-defined reports drop-down menu choose Basic, then select Keywords or Search Terms, depending on what you with to analyze.

Both ways offer the same options, including analytics for Keywords, Negative Keywords or Search terms. It’s up to you to decide what data you wish to get, and specify: segments such as date, click type, or device; columns for adding specific types of data you wish to include in the table, and filters for the statistics you’d like to see.

All the data you get in the Keywords and Search Terms reports are very useful and allows you to thoroughly analyze and assess your keywords performance and make informed decisions about your ads. At .

Track Search Terms Match Type Performance

The segments can show you the performance of search terms match type – whether a broad match, phrase match or exact match search terms triggered your keyword and your ad to show. That way you can compare data about clicks, impressions, CTRs or conversion rates for the specific search terms that have been used and triggered your ad. These statistics will help you find the keywords which have the best performance for a particular search term match type.

Track your Quality Score

The columns allow you to add or remove specific types of data you wish to include and analyze. And one very important thing that we strongly advise you to track is Quality Score in Adwords. It is a measurement of the relevancy of your ads, keywords and landing page to your customer. By enabling the Quality Score attribute, you will be able to see the attributed value for each keyword in your campaign, with 1 being the lowest and 10 the highest score.

google adwords quality score example

View Bid Simulations and Estimates

Another important column that you should enable is the adwords bid simulator. It estimates how the keyword bid changes impact your potential weekly Search Network clicks and costs. One more column that is not included in the default view of the report are the First page bid estimates, Top page bid estimates and First position bid estimates. These attributes will show you the approximate CPC bids you need to make to reach the first page, the top of the page or the first as position in Google SERPs when the search term is an exact match for your keyword. These estimates will be calculated based on your Quality score and the existing advertiser competition for the keyword in question. If the calculated estimates are very high, then probably you have a poor keyword Quality Score.

 

Adwords Bid Simulator

Sort Keyword Data

By using filters, you can find specific types of data that let you evaluate the performance of the keywords you use. You can use these data to learn which keywords are eligible to trigger ads, and which ones have good ROI.

Diagnose Individual or Multiple Keywords at Once

Another great option that AdWords offers is diagnosing the success of a single keyword or multiple keywords at once. By diagnosing one keyword you can learn whether your keyword is showing ads, and what’s it’s Quality Score. If it is showing ads, then it’s a keeper, but it if isn’t, Google will explain why and give you suggestion on how to solve the problem. Furthermore, you can break down the Quality Score and get statistics about your keyword relevance, landing page experience, and landing page loading time.

On the other hand, if you wish to diagnose multiple keywords, you will need to answer specific questions about your ad’s visibility. It’s up to you to choose the attributes you wish to text. After you run the test, you will receive results about the status of your keywords. But note that those results are only applicable in the time of testing and if you don’t act quickly, they can very soon become outdated.

Track, Analyze, Learn, and Optimize

As I mentioned, AdWords wants you to show your ad to fewer people and actually they reward you for it by using one feature designed specifically for that purpose, Quality Score. One key component of the Quality Score is CTR (Click-Through-Rate) – the percentage of people that click on your ad when they see it.  Increasing your CTR and boosting your Quality Score leads to lowering the CPC. And in order to achieve this, you need to carefully track and analyze your ads’ performance, especially your keywords.

Make the most of your Keywords report and learn how the keywords you use perform, which bids you need to change, and which keywords you need to remove. Additionally, using the Search Terms report, find out which search queries triggered your ad to be shown and clicked. Don’t be surprised if depending on your keywords matching options, the list of search terms differs from your keywords list. Those results can help you identify successful keywords and phrases that you can(should) add to your keywords list. And if your ad showed for what you consider to be irrelevant search terms, you can always use those phrases as negative keywords.

Either way, it’s a win-win situation. All you need to do is explore the available options, and learn from every bit of data and statistic you get. And if anything is unclear, and you are not sure which metrics or attributes to use and track, or what to do next once you received the stats, our expert PPC team can “translate” the data to you, and help you reach your goals.

3 Significant Changes to Dynamic Search Ads

If you are actively using Google AdWords, then you know that Dynamic Search Ads (DSA) are the easiest way to reach customers that precisely match your offer on Google. The best thing about DSA is that they use your website to help target your ads and fill in the keyword-based gaps in your campaigns. Even the best managed AdWords accounts that use many keywords can experience some setbacks without DSA, including missing out on relevant searches, experiencing delays in writing ads for new products, or being out of sync with what’s actually available on the destination website.

The benefits of using DSA are great. They help you save time and reach new markets faster and the ads are frequently and automatically updated as soon as you make changes to your webpages. They also show relevant results with dynamic headlines, giving you greater control over your campaign, and most importantly, helping you generate additional traffic and sales compared to what you get from keyword-targeted campaigns.

Now, Google is making an update to DSA by introducing three significant changes aimed at giving advertisers a better handle on the quality of the ad creativity and targeting. Let’s see what those changes actually are.  

Page Feed – More Control Over What You Advertise

Searchers are more likely to click on an ad and buy a product or service when it fits their needs or solves a problem. That is why having more control over what you advertise, and making sure your ads are very relevant to prospects is key.

In order to provide advertisers with an additional layer of control, Google introduced Page Feeds to DSA campaigns. That allows you to create a feed – a spreadsheet of the products or services you want to promote, and add it to a new or an existing dynamic search campaign. When you use a Page Feed to specify which URLs to use in your DSA, it helps Google determine when and to whom to show your ads, and where to direct people on your website.

Additionally, Google recommends adding custom labels to your selected URLs to categorize and organize the specific targets in groups. When you use labels such as “Special Promotion” or “Out of Stock” in your Page Feed, you can easily activate ads within that promotion at the same time, or pause them to stop unwanted paid traffic.

This is a very helpful feature that saves time and helps ecommerce advertisers save money by delivering only relevant content to their prospects.

Expanded Ads – Longer Descriptions for Deeper Messaging

Having more screen real-estate is always good when it comes to display advertising. You want your ads to be bigger and more noticeable, and also explain your offer better and in more detail. The transition to Extended Text Ads on Search and Display campaigns occurred in January, and these new, larger ads are about to make their way to DSA as well.

Longer headlines and descriptions allow advertisers to show more information about their business and their offering. The higher character count of the extended description field gives you additional space and lets you be more specific with the ad, while the other features remain dynamic. This enhancement is expected to roll out over this month (May 2017) and we are excited to welcome it.

Quality Enhancements – Be More Relevant

Ad relevancy and quality may begin with specifying which web pages and which products or services you want to promote, but it continues with having your ads show only when they are most relevant to the what the searchers are looking for.

Let’s say someone looks for a digital marketing agency in L.A. and instead of seeing the ad for Visible Factors, they are shown an ad about a digital marketing agency in Charlotte. Not very relevant, right? With the latest updates, Google is promising advertisers a quality enhancement focused on location-based targeting.  

Improved ad-targeting is very important and beneficial, especially for local businesses that want to reach a certain audience. When you know that your ad will be displayed to prospects which are in the vicinity of your business, you are willing to pay more, because you will get exposure and possibly more clicks and an increase in profit.

These three changes made to Dynamic Search Ads are allowing more control over your targeting and more specific descriptions of the products and services you are selling. This means your ads are about to have a higher conversion rate at lower CPA (Cost Per Action). 

So if you were hesitant about including DSA in your campaigns and weren’t sure if they’ll get you the wanted results, we hope these improvements change your mind and make you give DSA a chance. If you do, give us a call to help you set up your campaigns. We promise you’ll be in for an awesome and very fruitful ride.   

Google AdWords: A Guide to Finding High-value Keywords within Campaigns

Your work is only just beginning after you launch your campaign.  To get the ROI you need from your campaign, it is crucial to determine the strongest keywords within your AdWords campaign as soon as you have actionable data. The only way to keep your campaign strong enough to meet your goals is to regroup and analyze the performance of your keywords. This can seem daunting, especially if it is your first AdWords campaign. Fortunately, there are several simple ways to analyze and pin down high-value keywords within your campaign without relying on any expensive tools or secret tricks.

1. Pay attention to your click-through rate

If your CTR is low, your keyword selection and corresponding copy isn’t inviting clicks. This could be from poorly written ads, or mismatched keyword grouping. Your bid price goes up if you mismatch keywords with ads, further diminishing your ROI, so pay attention.

An easy way to boost your CTR and improve your ads readability is to use the {keyword} variable to generate a headline or sub headline for your ad based on the related search. To utilize this variable properly, you also need to choose a keyword for Google to fall back on if someone searches for a word or phrase that exceeds the ad text character limitations. The code is then {keyword:replacement text}. If you don’t choose a proper keyword that matches up with the text, it can confuse your audience.

Using Google’s keyword matching system is an important way to make your keywords work harder and improve your click-through rate. The fact is your audience is more likely to click on ads that reference their specific search query.

Utilizing Google’s keyword matching system, you can control how Google chooses whether or not to display them on a certain page of results. Search for bids on keywords with these variations to refine how your keywords target your audience:

Keyword = broad match

[Keyword] = exact match

“keyword” = phrase match

Eliminate any quote when you enter your keyword to match it as broad a search as possible. Add the square brackets, and Google will match your keyword to a search of the exact phrase.  Use quotes, and Google will match the words to the specific sequence they are entered. This further refines when your ad appears, further increasing the potential for a higher click through rate. Of course, there is no reason no bid on all three varieties to improve your results!

 

2. Experiment with keyword grouping

How many ad groups have you created? Your PPC campaign’s success hinges on connecting your target audience with the correct ad. If you are only showing one ad regardless of the keyword entered into Google then you are setting yourself up for failure. This is a major reason for low click-through rates. Take the time to create different ads based on your keyword groups. Make sure they make sense! And make sure they match.

If you are using too many keywords, usually over 20, you could be aiming too broadly with your keywords. Create new ad groups and refocus your keywords and their corresponding ads.

Also as important, is creating more than one ad for your group of keywords. Creating two or three ads is a great way to test your copy and see which ad is sharpest. This is also a great way to test how dynamic your keywords are, and what kind of language works best for them.

3. Pay attention to your ROI

Are your keyword purchases putting the right ads in front of the right crowd and creating conversions? If not, your keyword choices are either too broad or too specific.

Usually, it is the broader, short tail keywords that are problematic. They are usually high cost and high risk because they appeal to a broad audience. Short tail keywords do not necessarily create more conversions because they lack actionable phrasing. Stick with specific phrases and similar keywords. These long tail keywords are better for your ROI, generally being cheaper and stronger at connecting your target audience and creating conversions.

4. Compare your conversion rate to your landing page

If your conversion rates are low, your keywords and your landing page might not be meshing. It’s also possible that your keyword usage on the landing page or your call to action is weak. Sometimes all the keyword strategy in the world can’t make up for a dud of a landing page.

Start by tightening up your copy by keeping things relatable. Make sure to buy words that match the audience’s intent on their journey from the search, to your ad, to your landing page. Take a look at what your competitors are doing.  Compare your keyword choices with the choices of your competitors. How do they stack up? How does your copy and its use of keywords stack up? Are your keyword choices matching the ads you’re writing?

5. Use conversion tracking code to see which keywords are working and where

Google will supply any advertisers with a conversion tracking code that can be placed into certain parts of your site code to monitor whether your click-throughs are creating the desired effect of your campaign. You must place the code after the point on the page you want your audience to reach. This is crucial so you can accuratly track the visitors who reached your call to action or email sign up list, not just visitors to the page. Your keywords and their integration into the copy will have a large role in creating conversions while serving as a handy tool for gathering data to manage your keyword selection and usage.

 

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